Daylight is life

We need daylight to function; it’s as simple as that. When daylight is sparse, such as during winter or because we spend our days working indoors, our mental and physical processes run dry of energy and we become tired, slow and even sad. We typically don’t sleep well, whereas our appetite for sweets and high-calorie food tends to increase.

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Did you get enough light to sleep well?

When the night falls, the darkness is a signal for the body to increase its production of melatonin, also called the ‘sleep hormone’, and when the sun rises, the level of melatonin is supressed while serotonin, or one of the so-called ’happy hormones’, is turned up, telling the body that it’s time to get up and get active. Like a pendulum on a long string, our natural circadian rhythm depends our ability to fill up on sufficient light and darkness every 24 hours. If not, our system gets fundamentally messed up.

 

 

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Daylight increases our productivity

As humans we have undergone a fundamental transformation of lifestyle over very short time. Up till a century or two ago, we used to pass our time outside, adapting our affairs to the hours of sunlight. Now, in the name of productivity, we spend our days disrupting our circadian clock inside artificially lit offices. The irony of this is becoming increasingly apparent, as we realise that daylight itself powers our ability to perform at day and sleep at night.

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The power of blue light

Daylight is made up of every conceivable colour – yet, to the human eye it is pure white (except at sunset and sunrise when the light is filtered delightfully through the atmosphere –or when airborne water droplets refracts into a multi-coloured rainbow spectrum of light). Among all the colours of light, blue light waves are especially important to us humans. We depend on it.

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